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DIY isolation shelves?

Discussion in 'd.i.y.' started by horace, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. horace

    horace pfm Member

    Hi

    My TNT Flexy rack is coming along nicely, but I'm still a bit concerned that it won't offer much in the way of isolation - the shelves are bolted to the uprights, after all.
    So, my plan is to add a second, decoupled MDF shelf on top of each of the main MDF shelves. Question is, how to decouple them effectively? spikes would be good, but at £5 for a set of four the cost will soon mount.
    How about squash balls (halved) or screws through the bottom of the main shelves, pointing upwards with the second shelf resting on the points?
    Basically, I'm thinking cheap and effective. Any suggestions? Perhaps my thinking is all wrong here and I should be trying a different approach altogether?

    Grateful for some advice.

    Cheers

    Martin
     
  2. Bob McC

    Bob McC Living the life of Riley

    ball nutters

    Bob
     
  3. horace

    horace pfm Member

    Bob

    Ball nutters?

    Sounds interesting. Now, if I had the faintest idea what you mean I'd....

    Grateful for an explanation, as my brain is hurting.

    Cheers

    Martin
     
  4. Bob McC

    Bob McC Living the life of Riley

    ball bearings from a bike shop sitting in nuts from B&Q just like in a Naim fraim (well almost!).

    Bob
     
  5. laverda

    laverda pfm Member

    Ball nuts 'nuts with a ball' on the end.
     
  6. horace

    horace pfm Member

    Ah, dome nuts!

    Cool. Hadn't thought of that.

    Thanks

    Yet another trip to the local fasteners warehouse......


    Martin
     
  7. horace

    horace pfm Member

    Err, dome nuts vs bearings sitting inside nuts?

    Is that a worthwhile debate or should I pass?


    Martin
     
  8. Bob McC

    Bob McC Living the life of Riley

    Whichever you choose they'll be cheap. Use in threes and they're even self levelling.

    Bob
     
  9. horace

    horace pfm Member

    Cheap AND self levelling.

    Oh, Nirvana!


    Martin
     
  10. Sid and Coke

    Sid and Coke and so the rebuild continues..

    If you do go for the self levelling 3 point contact as suggested by Bob, i have found it a good idea to mount some small rubber, cork, felt, etc self adhesive feet into the corners of the end with just one contact. You may need to trim these feet so that they don't touch the lower surface but only by 1mm or so`. In this way they don't effect the 3 point, self leveling aspect of the platform, but if you are a bit heavy handed it will prevent the corners dipping down to low and your component possibly sliding off.
     
  11. JimDog

    JimDog pfm Member

    Please explain what you mean.
    thanks
    Jim
     
  12. Vinny

    Vinny pfm Member

    You may have missed the boat (by 16 years)?

    A record for a PFM resurrection?
     
    Barry123 likes this.
  13. Pete L

    Pete L pfm Member

    I used these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07KC3L7Y1/?tag=pinkfishmedia-21

    Very effective under my acrylic shelves. Probably a bit more than you want to spend, but you can actually make something very similar using some springs and some cut-to-size thick MDF discs off the net. Costs next to nothing and works very well. Similar principle to Townsend Audio isolators but much cheaper!

    Pete
     
  14. Bob McC

    Bob McC Living the life of Riley

    Great name.
     
  15. Helen Bach

    Helen Bach if it ain't Baroque ...

    in general, stiff things don't isolate, soft things do. So spikes are not isolating, sorbothane feet are.

    Mdf has very little damping, so will 'collect' vibrations from sound in the room, and distribute those vibrations to all parts of your rack through the threaded rods, and as the vibrations will be amplifier by the mdf, it will make the whole thing much worse!
     
  16. Pete L

    Pete L pfm Member

    I agree completely on this. I moved away from spikes many years ago as I found that although they could give a superficially more immediate and detailed sound with seemingly greater clarity over time the effect was fatiguing and unnatural. Compliant isolation like sorbothane, rubber, springs or foam pads etc. I find gives a much more natural presentation, more laid back with detail still present but not 'in-your-face' as with spikes. Personal taste also comes into play with these things of course.

    Pete
     
  17. Helen Bach

    Helen Bach if it ain't Baroque ...

    It took me a while to realise this. Why would someone want to impose their own view of the music. But I listen mostly to classical music, where I want to hear exactly what is on the recording. [or 'exactly' within my budget!]
     
  18. Pete L

    Pete L pfm Member

    Yes agreed. I dislike systems that put a 'spin' on the music, ie. make it sound more exciting, more dynamic etc. than it should be. Many people do seem to like these effects though. The best systems in my view are the ones that simply 'get out of the way' and let the music speak for itself. Such systems need not cost a fortune either - my own very modest system does quite well at it.

    Pete
     
  19. Helen Bach

    Helen Bach if it ain't Baroque ...

    couldn't agree more.;)
     
    Tom Bonjour likes this.
  20. Yomanze

    Yomanze pfm Member

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