Advertisement


  1. Things you need to know about the new ‘Conversations’ PM system:

    a) DO NOT REPLY TO THE NOTIFICATION EMAIL! I get them, not the intended recipient. I get a lot of them and I do not want them! It is just a notification, log into the site and reply from there.

    b) To delete old conversations use the ‘Leave conversation’ option. This is just delete by another name.
    Dismiss Notice

Should we have a Tool Tips Thread?

Discussion in 'd.i.y.' started by timH, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. timH

    timH pfm Member

  2. Chops54

    Chops54 pfm Member

    I bought a nice set of small files in a plastic case from Aldi the other week for a fiver. Small files are always handy.

    I use a pair of nail clippers, the fold up type, for cutting off component leads after soldering. One of my favorite tools :)
     
  3. Arkless Electronics

    Arkless Electronics Trade: Amp design and repairs.

    Diamond coated files are great and can sometimes be had from the likes of Lidl quite cheaply. Diamond coated "Dremel" bits are also a god send!
     
    blossomchris and Chops54 like this.
  4. Andrew L Weekes

    Andrew L Weekes Reverse Engineer

    I think there might be some talking at cross-purposes here.

    A proper crimp is a better and more reliable electrical connection than a solder joint, BUT, if you've crimped on a spade connector and are then using that to make the primary connection, it most definitely isn't better than soldering the wire without the connector.

    A properly done crimp forms a gas tight cold weld that is much more reliable, stronger and longer lasting than a solder joint, but it does require the right tools, the right process and care. Soldering is frequently easier and far cheaper - crimp tools are bloody expensive, often costing hundreds or even thousands for just hand tools.

    Also, be wary soldering things like IEC sockets, they almost all use riveting to secure the pins to the terminals, with a layer of plastic in between - heat from soldering can deform the latter and cause failure of the terminal / pin rivetted joint.

    Andy.
     
    Chops54 likes this.
  5. timH

    timH pfm Member

    Rug Doc likes this.
  6. mansr

    mansr Objectionist

  7. Barrymagrec

    Barrymagrec pfm Member

    Odd, my Dad used to use wire cutters for cutting his nails.....
     
  8. Arkless Electronics

    Arkless Electronics Trade: Amp design and repairs.

    Indeed I'm referring to the actual spade connector as being the problem. Also the crimp itself as most often it is very badly done. Most home crimping results in, as I sad above, a poor connection that is anything but gas tight and often a tug on the wire will pull it out of the supposedly crimped connection. When I need to use a spade terminal (rarely) I solder the wire to it, which can look untidy but is better than home crimping.

    FWIW the only circumstances in which I agree that crimping is better all round is for very heavy duty industrial applications, "welding cable++" type heavy duty where it can give a mechanically stronger connection of greater reliability.

    With anything like IEC sockets which have plastic parts it is important to prepare the surfaces well and use a hot iron to avoid melting plastic.
     
  9. Barrymagrec

    Barrymagrec pfm Member

    Yes, proper crimp tools are essential*, the idea that you can just squash the crimp with pliers is rubbish.

    * And yes they are often very expensive.
     
  10. mansr

    mansr Objectionist

    Getting this back on topic, does anyone have any recommendations for good crimp tools?
     
  11. Barrymagrec

    Barrymagrec pfm Member

    I mentioned the T & B crimp tool that I use for Red, Blue and Yellow crimps up thread, I dont have a lot of experience with other types for these crimps (other than the cheap non ratchet types, these are little better than pliers), I have many other crimp tools for various more specialised connectors, these are mostly supplied by the connector manufacturer.
     
  12. timH

    timH pfm Member

    Do we need a Crimp thread?
     
  13. Barrymagrec

    Barrymagrec pfm Member

    Why not, there`s been plenty of solder threads.
     
  14. JimmyB

    JimmyB pfm Member

  15. Chops54

    Chops54 pfm Member

    I've done that too especially when I've ripped a fingernail whilst in the middle of a job.
     
  16. mansr

    mansr Objectionist

    Guilty. I have yet to determine any benefit from cutting one's nails with ESD safe cutters.
     
  17. Arkless Electronics

    Arkless Electronics Trade: Amp design and repairs.

    I've used proper crimping machinery in industry for VERY heavy duty stuff, on thyristor switched HF induction ingot furnaces in fact. Hand pumped hydraulic (long levers) with a selection of crimping bits and loads'a money!
     
  18. JimmyB

    JimmyB pfm Member

    Can we have a link to that wire stripper thread that was quite enlightening a while back? That may be a positive addition to a tool tip thread!

    I'd do it but my wife just caught me typing 'strippers' into the search bar........
     
  19. Arkless Electronics

    Arkless Electronics Trade: Amp design and repairs.

    Yer have to be careful googling electronics stuff... Could have been "plastic knobs".... be thankful for the small mercies!
     
  20. S-Man

    S-Man Kinkless Tetrode Admirer

    I recently bought a 3.5mm flat blade Wiha for electrical work - not cheap. First impressions were that it was rather skinny and flexy. However after using it I have to say that it is excellent. The narrow profile makes it easy to "twiddle" and the slight flex seems to help keep the blade in the screw slot.
     

Share This Page




Advertisement

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice